04
Jun
2020

David Haye admits Tyson Fury, Anthony Joshua ‘hard to beat’ at his best

Cohen Jones 02/05/2020
David Haye

📸 Mark Robinson

Despite having the credentials of being one of the best British world champions of all time, former king David Haye has played down his chances of being today’s best.

Recently commenting that he could be enticed out of retirement to face either Tyson Fury or Anthony Joshua, Haye is not overstating his odds.

The Bermondsey man is under no illusions about what a mammoth task it would be. Even at his very best of ten years ago.

Speaking to Michelle Phelps for Behind The Gloves, ‘The Hayemaker’ was honest in his assessment of the current world rulers

“I remember watching Anthony Joshua when he fought Andy Ruiz. I thought, ‘Damn, that would be very, very difficult to beat,” Haye pointed out.

“Even on my best day, that version of him (AJ), the one that is boxing and light on his feet, he’s ready and fearful as well.’ That’s hard to beat.”

On Fury, he added: “I thought the same thing when I saw Tyson Fury fight Wilder. I’m watching. I’m like, ‘That guy is a hard guy to beat.’

“So those are the two performances I’ve seen since I’ve been retired. I watched them and I’ve gone, ‘That would have been hard work. No matter what version of me that was.’”

Losing twice to Tony Bellew, firstly in 2017 and again in 2018, Haye was a shadow of his former self in both bouts.

Making good paydays from Sky Sports Box Office, the veteran well and truly cashed in alongside Bellew.


DAVID HAYE DAY

Any notion of the two-weight world title-holder making a successful return at 39 would be met with considerable skepticism.

The glory days of defeating Nikolai Valuev in his ‘David vs Goliath’ moment back in 2009 are well and truly behind him.

Luckily, Haye’s legacy is secured. This is despite the Bellew stoppages. Therefore, concentrating on promoting Derek Chisora and his commentary obligations is firmly the order of the day.

The British boxing fraternity is far more concerned with Fury and Joshua securing a clash between themselves. But only once the coronavirus outbreak is under further control.