24
May
2019

Quaise Khademi ready for super-flyweight title run beginning May 4

RINGSIDE 25/04/2019

Quaise Khademi has revealed what’s driving him on to conquer the world.

Khademi goes into his fight on Mickey Helliet’s show at the York Hall in Bethnal Green on Saturday, May 4 convinced he will soon be ready to test himself against Britain’s top super flyweights.

The 24 year old from East Ham has won all five professional fights – one inside the distance – but his entire life has been a battle.

Khademi was born in Afghanistan. “There was a war on,” he said, “and we lived in a hideout. My brother was shot and killed and we went to Pakistan.

“The Taliban would come round asking about my brothers and we ended up leaving.

“The United Kingdom was always the target.

“There were around 30 of us. There were my parents, my brothers and sisters and their children.

“We walked and drove, spent a few months in Russia and eventually got to Germany.

“I started going to school there, but my dad said: ‘We need to get to the UK’ and eventually, we got here.

“Plenty of people died doing that journey, but my parents kept me strong.

“They didn’t go on that journey for themselves. They did it for their children, so they could have a better future.

“I want to win a world title for them.”

Khadmei was hoping for a shot at the Southern Area championship next.

The Johnny Eames-trained box of tricks says champion Ricky Little turned down what would have been the best pay day of his career to fight him and instead, he defends against Sam Cantwell in June.

Khademi says he has an awkward style he’s been developing since he first took up boxing at 15.

“I got into bad habits,” he said, “and there were lots of complaints about me at school.

“I decided I needed to keep myself busy in my spare time and ended up going to the boxing gym.

“Within 15 seconds of my first spar, I looked down and the other guy was on the floor. I decided to stick with boxing !”

Khademi went on to have 29 amateur bouts before turning professional.


 

“I want to work my way up,” he said, “starting with the Southern Area title.

“I’m grateful to this country for the life it’s given me and want to call myself British champion, but the ultimate goal is the world title. I want to win it for Britain and Afghanistan, but most of all, for my parents.”

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