22
Sep
2020

Trainer wants green light for pros in the Olympics at Rio 2016

Antonin Vavrda 28/05/2016

Amateur boxing isn’t just about fighting – it’s also about backstage talk and lobbying. And the latest development of events suggests the current plan to feature professional boxers at the Olympics without any restrictions won’t be the only novelty we’re about to witness.

“Amateur boxing hasn’t been amateur for quite some time. There’s talk about having amateur fights that will last as much as five rounds, just as it is currently practised in WSB (editor’s note: a semi-professional boxing competition founded by AIBA, the International Boxing Association), and this not only at the Olympics. This change should be in effect since January 2017,” said Valentin Vranceanu, the trainer of Romanian beast Mihai Nistor, during his exclusive interview to Profiboxing.cz and Lidove Noviny (READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE).

Vranceanu is currently active not only as the trainer of the reigning APB super heavyweight champion Nistor (editor’s note: APB is the professional boxing league held under the AIBA banner), but also the head coach of the Romanian boxing team and well respected boxing person not only in his homeland, but also in Europe. After all, his numerous training seminars held throughout the entire Old Continent only prove this recognition.

“I’m definitely for the appearance of professional boxers at the Olympics. They should be given the green light right now, in Rio. I alone don’t consider myself an amateur boxer. I train like a professional, making my living through boxing. I guess this move will contribute to unifying boxing in one sport,” added Nistor to the words of his trainer during the aforementioned interview after his triumphant ride through the boxing Grand Prix in Usti.

The forthcoming AIBA meeting, which is scheduled to take place between May and June in Lausanne, will thus discuss not only the amendment of rules which will allow the professional fighters to compete at the Olympics without any restrictions, but also other topics as well.

In view of these events, the two-year ban which AIBA imposed a month ago on Czech light heavyweight champion Martin Podlucky for him being active in other combat sports than boxing prior to 2013 and not informing the federation about this fact as it is required in its February 2015 enforced rules really seems like a strange and bizarre affair.