07
Mar
2021

Boxing trading with the big name players

WBN 23/03/2016
Floyd Mayweather Manny Pacquiao Pay Per View

Naoki Fukuda

There’s no doubt that boxing is still booming despite the emergence of MMA / UFC as a marketable fighting commodity as proven with the welterweight super-fight held on May 2, 2015.

Floyd Mayweather Jr. earned a nine-figure check, plus add-ons, when defeating career-rival Manny Pacquiao at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas – eventually pocketing over $200m once the pay-per-view was totalled.

Pacquiao himself cleared over $100m in revenue from what was the most lucrative punch-up of all time to make even the traders over at Binary Uno rubbing their eyes in disbelief at the numbers crunched.

The sport has cemented its place as the biggest earner of all – once the stars are aligned in the right way, although those fighting it out at the bottom would tell you a different story. Small hall shows are still popping up anywhere and everywhere as new promoters attempt to plot their own path to a potential pot of gold at the end of the rainbow.

Granted that the forces of Mayweather and Pacquiao are hard to replicate, whilst someone has to take on that earning mantle and those nurturing the younger talent always hope to keep their prize assets in their stable.

It’s not always possible though as Gennady Golovkin and Sergey Kovalev have proven. The Eastern Europeans were complete unknowns just five years ago, having enjoyed amateur success but not the clout of a major promoter behind him.

‘GGG’ and ‘Krusher’ both turned it around with moves to the USA, so how do those smaller promoters plan on making it to the top and keep fighters loyal at the same time?

That seems to be the big question and why the monopoly lies with just a chosen few at the head of the table.

The likes of Top Rank, Golden Boy, K2, Matchroom Boxing, Main Events, Sauerland and Al Haymon’s Premier Boxing Champions hold all the aces when it comes to the name players, whilst those lower in the food chain have to make do with whatever scraps may come their way.