20
Jan
2020

CJ Ross addresses judging controversy

Phil Jay 23/01/2015

Over a year on from stepping away from the sport under a cloud, judge Cynthia J. Ross has opened up to WBN on the controversy surrounding her final boxing scorecard as she contemplates making a comeback.

Ross caused a stir when handing in a 114-114 card for the Floyd Mayweather v Canelo Alvarez fight in September 2013 and decided to take a step back as fans and media alike gave the official’s reputation a battering.

Since then Ross has taken stock of her career, which stretches back to a four-round clash between John Avila and Abel Pedroza at Bally’s in Reno, Nevada back in 1992, and plans to make moves for a return to combats sports in some capacity soon.

“I have been working, taking care of family business and I also have relocated out of the state of Nevada,” Ross exclusively told World Boxing News.

Asked whether she is eager to get back to her previous hot-seat after the Mayweather v Canelo bout, Ross added: “Absolutely! What people don’t understand is that all three judges could have ended any fight, and as a result have the same score, say 116/112. But if you look at the commission’s score sheet, you would likely see they arrived at those scores by different rounds.

On the criticism she received for scoring the bout a draw, Ross stated: “I have to consider the source because unless the critic was sitting in my seat viewing the fight from the angles I had, and was able to feel or see the power and the flat and missed punches that are not seen by a camera, It’s not real criticism.

Ross had previously raised questions with her scoring of the Manny Pacquiao v Timothy Bradley fight a year earlier when handing in a score of 115-113 to the challenger, when many saw a wide victory for Pacquiao over the twelve round duration. As judge Duane Ford agreed with the Bradley win and Jerry Roth also had it close at 115-113 to Pacquiao, Ross believes her score is fully justified and considers it her best performance sitting ringside in over 20 years overseeing top class bouts.

“In the Bradley v Pacquiao fight I was in the majority of the three judges for 12 out of 12 rounds so I would say that has to be the standout fight for me,” said Ross. “But they have all been memorable. I especially have enjoyed the undercard fights which are often more competitive and challenging to judge.”

WBN was outraged by the recent scoring of Chris Van Heerden’s make or break clash with Cecil McCalla which took place in New York, and Ross said that despite not seeing the fight, she can sympathize with concerns over the outcome. McCalla was given a 99-91 victory by Ed Scunzio even though Van Heerden looked on top for the majority of the fight and took a split decision win, and has so far gone unpunished since the result in early January.

“The Van Heerden fight doesn’t look good on paper, but I would have to look at the scoresheet to see how many rounds they agreed on,” she commented, before WBN posed a final question on what other capacities Ross may consider for her imminent move back into the firing line.

“If not boxing, then I would like to have been involved with MMA. I personally have a background in Karate and keeping riding times in college wrestling, but I think it would be a natural thing to pick up in MMA,” she concluded.