20
Sep
2020

Bernard Hopkins attributes longevity to ‘preservation of mechanics’

Phil Jay 29/10/2014

New territory is being covered by WBA and IBF light-heavyweight champion Bernard Hopkins each and every time the American fighter steps into the gym to train for an upcoming fight.

At 49, nobody in the history of the sport has been able to sustain such a high level of performance with their 50th birthday just around the corner, but on November 8, ‘The Alien’ will aim to extend his record of being the oldest world title holder ever when he tackles hard-punching Russian Sergey Kovalev in Atlantic City.

Taking part in his media workout on Tuesday, Hopkins was keen to divulge what he believes has helped to keep him punching well past the usual veteran stage as the opportunity to be the first world champion at 50 looms large.

“When I look back at the last five years of my career, I’m spending less time in the gym than I did in the beginning of my career. I’m fighting 12-round fights, why am I training for four hours? These are the things you do when you’re young. When you get older you realize that you had to survive it, that’s how I got here,” said Hopkins.

“When you look at the things I do, the lifestyle and the discipline. You would say I’m preserved. You would say that I’m well kept. You would say I’m clean in the garage. The mechanics are all brand new, because I took care of them.”

In regards to trading blows with Kovalev, a recent poll of 23 media members saw Hopkins shade the vote 12 to 11, although almost all are aware that ‘B-Hop’ has to avoid getting caught flush at all costs.

“I have the same thoughts on Kovalev that most people here do. He’s a dangerous puncher. He has an over 90 percent knockout rate and anyone who fights this guy has the opportunity to not be the same once he exits the ring. We won’t take anything away from this guy because he’s real.

“Kovalev is a threat to anybody. It won’t be an easy fight, even if it looks easy to you. I don’t just have to beat the man, but I have to beat a lot of people. They’re either going to watch me win or watch me lose, and I don’t mind playing that game. I don’t believe in luck. I believe in whoever brings the best and whoever sacrifices the most to be victorious will win,” added the boxing legend.

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